March 2, 2021
mortgage - Wiktionary

mortgage – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Different kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman morgage, Center French mortgage, from Outdated French mort gage (dying pledge), after a translation of judicial Medieval Latin mortuum vadium or mortuum wadium, from mortuum + vadium or wadium, of Germanic (Frankish) origin, from a root *waddi, wadja. Evaluate gage and likewise wage. So referred to as as a result of the deal dies both when the debt is paid or when cost fails.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mortgage (plural mortgages)

  1. (regulation) A particular type of secured mortgage the place the aim of the mortgage have to be specified to the lender, to buy belongings that have to be fastened (not movable) property, akin to a home or piece of farm land. The belongings are registered because the authorized property of the borrower however the lender can seize them and get rid of them if they aren’t glad with the style by which the compensation of the mortgage is performed by the borrower. As soon as the mortgage is totally repaid, the lender loses this proper of seizure and the belongings are then deemed to be unencumbered.

    We’re renting a property within the metropolis centre as a result of we won’t afford to get a mortgage but.

  2. (out of date) State of being pledged.

    lands given in mortgage

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mortgage (third-person singular easy current mortgages, current participle mortgaging, easy previous and previous participle mortgaged)

  1. (transitive, regulation) To borrow towards a property, to acquire a mortgage for an additional function by freely giving the fitting of seizure to the lender over a hard and fast property akin to a home or piece of land; to pledge a property so as to get a mortgage.

    to mortgage a property, an property, a store

    We mortgaged our home so as to begin an organization.

  2. (transitive, figuratively) To pledge and make liable; to make topic to obligation; to realize an instantaneous consequence by paying for it in the long run.
    • 1982, Verne Moberg, The Reality and Work of Victoria Benedictsson, web page 72:

      She mortgaged her future for the pleasures of the connection with the sculptor, a relationship she knew could be quick.

    • 2001, Antony Rowland, Tony Harrison and the Holocaust, web page 193:

      Like a latter-day Faustus who has mortgaged his soul to the pursuit of his artwork, Harrison now desperately craves the paternal love from which his studying has estranged him.

Associated phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]


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